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1 week ago

Soxophoneplayer

Another craft show come and gone. Two days at the Pottawatomi Spinners and Weavers guild sale. It was nice to connect with my fiber friends and to make some new ones too.

Slept like a log after getting home, giving Jonah a late supper and doing the farm chores. I saved unloading till this morning and took my time with it, reconfiguring my 'tubs' to be ready for market next weekend. Onward...
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Another craft show come and gone. Two days at the Pottawatomi Spinners and Weavers guild sale. It was nice to connect with my fiber friends and to make some new ones too.

Slept like a log after getting home, giving Jonah a late supper and doing the farm chores. I saved unloading till this morning and took my time with it, reconfiguring my tubs to be ready for  market next weekend.  Onward...

Comment on Facebook

Great looking roving, locks and spun wool!

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2 weeks ago

Soxophoneplayer

A Family Affair

I've been prepping for the Pottawatomi Spinners and Weavers sale tomorrow and Saturday at the library in Owen Sound.

I finally cracked open the bin of lopi style yarn I had spun from Chas' fleece, for checking over, tweezing any remnants of the hay crop, and labeling.

Chas' yarn turned is amazingly soft and a delightful silver with enough dark accents to keep it interesting. He is purebred Shetland ram whose genetics are 100% derived from the original Shetland flock imported to North America. His staple is very generous - and the decision to go to lopi style yarn vs the fingering weight I often prefer was because his fibers were too long to process to the latter.

His yarn is 158 yds/ 140 grams.

Having this yarn prepped now completes a Yarn Family - Chas - father, Beaulagh - mother (3 ply sport 70/30 with mohair, and Beauregard - son (3 ply sport 70/30 with mohair).

Chas and Beauregard are a true reflection of their fleece colour. Beaulagh is actually a deeper brown, but blending with white mohair lightens the tone of her yarn.
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A Family Affair

Ive been prepping for the Pottawatomi Spinners and Weavers sale tomorrow and Saturday at the library in Owen Sound.

I finally cracked open the bin of lopi style yarn I had spun from Chas fleece, for checking over, tweezing any remnants of the hay crop, and labeling.

Chas yarn turned is amazingly soft and a delightful silver with enough dark accents to keep it interesting. He is purebred Shetland ram whose genetics are 100% derived from the original Shetland flock imported to North America. His staple is very generous - and the decision to go to lopi style yarn vs the fingering weight I often prefer was because his fibers were too long to process to the latter.

His yarn is 158 yds/ 140 grams.

Having this yarn prepped now completes a Yarn Family - Chas - father, Beaulagh - mother (3 ply sport 70/30 with mohair, and Beauregard - son (3 ply sport 70/30 with mohair).

Chas and Beauregard are a true reflection of their fleece colour. Beaulagh is actually a deeper brown, but blending with white mohair lightens the tone of her yarn.Image attachmentImage attachment

2 weeks ago

Soxophoneplayer

Yesterday was the first snowfall of the season. The old girls are kind of meh about it, having been through other winters, but the lambs were really funny - skipping and dancing, and jumping in the air clicking their heels together.

Here Bonnie is checking out 'a smell'. The coyotes are plentiful this year and have been yattering regularly from late afternoon to early morning. But, touch wood, I've yet to see them in the pastures, party because of my supercharged electric fence.

This is my highest risk paddock for predation - the neighbours reforested about 20 years ago and the bush is now mature and home to all kinds of wannabe sheep eaters. Its also the highest risk time of year as the spring born coyote litters are now being taught to hunt by their parents, so they're essentially traveling in packs.
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Yesterday was the first snowfall of the season. The old girls are kind of meh about it, having been through other winters, but the lambs were really funny - skipping and dancing, and jumping in the air clicking their heels together.

Here Bonnie is checking out a smell.  The coyotes are plentiful this year and have been yattering regularly from late afternoon to early morning. But, touch wood, Ive yet to see them in the pastures, party because of my supercharged electric fence.

This is my highest risk paddock for predation - the neighbours reforested about 20 years ago and the bush is now mature and home to all kinds of wannabe sheep eaters. Its also the highest risk time of year as the spring born coyote litters are now being taught to hunt by their parents, so theyre essentially traveling in packs.

Comment on Facebook

That’s scary about the coyotes! We here them chatter sometimes

I tapped the wood as I read this! We have a cougar in the urban growth area I live so I do not go out, in the dark, without taking a good look.

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3 weeks ago

Soxophoneplayer

What a cold, wet, dreary day on the farm. Even the sheep looked out the barn door and went 'meh'.

Debating whether to wind yarn or build a nice fire and have a lazy day.
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What a cold, wet, dreary day on the farm. Even the sheep looked out the barn door and went meh.

Debating whether to wind yarn or build a nice fire and have a lazy day.

Comment on Facebook

Sheep are smart! Lol If you are cold, make a fire...your yarn will still be there. ☺️

Exactly! Love that idea!

After u light the fire u can wind the yarn

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3 weeks ago

Soxophoneplayer

Putting the finishing touches on some Santa Sox knit earlier - black button eyes, pom pom nose and a few locks of Wensleydale for a mustache. Assorted yarn from stash.

The pattern for these sox was written by Anita Rohay Huddly and published on the Circular Sock Machine Knitters 2.0 Facebook group.
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Putting the finishing touches on some Santa Sox knit earlier - black button eyes, pom pom nose and a few locks of Wensleydale for a mustache. Assorted yarn from stash.

The pattern for these sox was written by Anita Rohay Huddly and published on the Circular Sock Machine Knitters 2.0 Facebook group.
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